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Tackling Epilepsy to Deliver Value to Patients

07/26/2017 Author: Allyson Funk, U.S. Communications & Public Relations, UCB

Brain diseases affect one in six people around the world. The range of conditions affecting the central nervous system – and how they impact the patient – is wide, making unlocking the science behind them complicated.

 

At UCB, we are committed to delivering value to patients and looking for new ways to help patients living with neurological diseases. One area in which we’ve been working for decades is epilepsy. While it is the most common serious neurological condition – defined by recurrent seizures – it manifests itself in different ways for different patients. To date, more than 100 different epilepsy syndromes have been identified.

 

For patients, seizure types and frequency vary greatly. Some are short, like muscle jerks, while others are prolonged convulsions. Some patients may experience them rarely, while others battle seizures multiple times per day. Focal seizures start in just one part of the brain, while generalized seizures are the result of simultaneous abnormal activity of the whole brain. For patients battling epilepsy, regaining control – and getting seizures under control – is often a primary goal.

Across the biopharmaceutical sector, we have come a long way in treatment. Today, nearly half of patients newly diagnosed with epilepsy become seizure free with their first anti-epileptic drug.

But for one in three patients, seizures remain uncontrolled because no available treatment works for them. These are the great challenges we continue to tackle through industry-wide innovation and collaboration. Breakthrough science and technology can help unlock better ways to care for and treat patients living with epilepsy. Whether it is helping find a therapy that works for an individual patient faster or finding new ways to treat the root cause of disease, we are committed to continuing to unlock the science and find new ways to improve the lives of patients.